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LMI TAPIOCA

The host partners of the International Joint Laboratory ‘Tropical Atlantic Interdisciplinary laboratory on physical, biogeochemical, ecological and human dynamics’ (IJL TAPIOCA), the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE) and the Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE) have a long history of interaction with IRD in marine science. Brazil recently recognized the major importance of the natural resources and mineral stocks along its 7,500 km of coastline (called “Blue Amazon” by the Brazil’s authorities) and TAPIOCA team members are involved in a variety of scientific and academic projects aiming at resolving key question on climate variability, biogeochemical, physical, biological and human interactions in the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

Tapioca brings together nearly 90 scientists and students involved in research projects such as the “Pirata”, “Abraços” or “Mafalda” projects. The laboratory will focus on research areas related to climate change and marine spatial planning. The laboratory will strengthen research in the field and invest in the training of new students.

TAPIOCA’s medium- and long-term objective is to create an inter-university centre of excellence in tropical marine sciences with all the scientists involved.

More information here.

The silicon cycle is a historical LEMAR theme.

The study of the trace metals cycle is one of LEMAR’s strong themes. Improving our knowledge of the metal cycle is crucial to better understand and quantify oceanic biogeochemical cycles of major elements (C, Si, N, S) and the biological carbon pump. The analysis of trace metals and their speciation is particularly difficult because their concentrations are extremely low and their cycle is complex. LEMAR is one of the internationally recognized laboratories for the study of the trace metals cycle, notably through the use and development of advanced techniques (SF-ICP-MS in the context of PSO, FIA, voltammetry). Our expertise in both the dissolved and particulate phase will allow us to study the interactions between these two reservoirs, notably at the oceanic interfaces. These interactions are very little studied at present and yet fundamental to better understand the bioavailability of metals. This theme will strengthen our international visibility, particularly in the context of new GEOTRACES oceanographic campaigns.